Paula Kahumbu and Dino Martins named National Geographic Emerging Explorers


It is with great pleasure that we announce that our Chairman and Vice Chairman have just been named Emerging Explorers by National Geographic.

“Some of the world’s most critical conservation problems, and valuable solutions, go unnoticed. I want to shine a light on people whose efforts make a truly remarkable difference.”

Paula Kahumbu brims with energy and passion for preserving threatened wildlife and habitats. She’s also discovered another frequently endangered species: conservationists themselves. She explains that “conservationists do crucial work on a shoestring, cut off from the rest of the world. They’re in remote, isolated places, some even risking their lives, with no chance of getting on the international radar screen. Meanwhile, millions of people who care about the catastrophic loss of wildlife and habitats aren’t sure how to help.”

Legendary conservationist Richard Leakey saw the Internet as a way to connect individuals concerned about the planets threatened flora and fauna with those working on the frontlines to save it. Today his brainchild, WildlifeDirect, gives about 120 conservation projects an online platform to share day-by-day challenges and victories via blogs, diaries, videos, photos, and podcasts. As executive director of the effort (wildlifedirect.org) Kahumbu has the vehicle she was looking for to bring conservation stories out of the shadows and into the minds of people who want to help. Read more 

“Every single person on our planet has a diet that includes food made possible by pollinating insects. When this connection is threatened, all of humanity is threatened.”

Do you like chocolate? Coffee? Pollinating insects make these and hundreds of other foods possible. The threatened habitats that support those insects may often be out of sight and out of mind, but Dino Martins brings their importance home. “Pollinators are one of the strongest connections between conservation and something everyone needs—food.” With his infectious enthusiasm and practical solutions, Martins acts as a pollinator himself, carrying crucial information to Kenya’s isolated farmers, schoolchildren, and a larger world of travelers and scientists. “Insects are the invisible, behind-the-scenes workers that keep the planet going,” Martins observes. “They do incredibly complicated things but are never recognized for it. I’m privileged to be their messenger.” . Read more …

For more information and press release please contact Paula Kahumbu through fonnap1@gmail.com

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